Town Center TIF

Last night, I wore my Town Center Village Board hat at a PATH meeting that provided useful information on Tax Increment Financing. This PDF explains the basics of TIF, so I’ll leave it at – A development increases the property or sales taxes on a piece of land, so they get to keep the increase, or increment. That reimburses them for some of their costs of the project. Howard County, or at least the County Executive’s administration, is thinking about doing this for the Downtown Columbia development. This proposal is also somewhat tied to the affordable housing that Howard Hughes wants to build…on county land. The article says that’s not true, but I don’t see how one can unlink them.

Usually, TIF is used for “blighted” areas – think unoccupied, dilapidated buildings.

During the recent primary campaign for Board of Education, many people were disturbed by one candidate’s use of “inner-city” Columbia.

These two things are not true. Yes, we have extreme poverty in parts of Howard County and yes, there are some homes that need external fixes. But blight? I live pretty much as close to the area being discussed as possible and I do not see blight. Maybe some run-down homes that need investment, but blight? Yes, we have some crime, but let’s get some perspective. We have a wide range of socioeconomic circumstances that we need to deal with.

But is giving away public dollars to a private corporation the solution? Usually, counties/cities needing renewal offer developers incentives to make a not-so-attractive spot more attractive. They forfeit the increase in tax dollars, hoping that other stars will align that make a good investment.

I wonder how much our County has appropriated forĀ  TIF for FY 2017. Oh, $70 million & more in 2018? That article, however, is outdated. Last night, County Council member Jen Terrasa said it is now $120 million with another $40 million more in future years.That’s not to say that it would all be for Downtown Columbia, but…probably fair to assume most of it would be.

Juxtapose that number with the “shortfall” between the County Council approved HCPSS budget and their request – $48 million. Granted, many of us do not believe that the increase needed to be that much. A bunch of the increase was in health insurance costs, which has been wrong for the last several years.

But…How much would I love to fund an increase in special education? More reading and math specialists? PARAEDUCATORS in Kindergarten? (Sorry, I’m yelling, that one is really irksome to me. “Other counties don’t use paraeducators as much as we do?” “We’re NOT other counties!”)

Politics and negotiations are about trade-offs. But this TIF proposal, regardless of what the number is, seems rather one-sided.

On a positive note, it seemed that 95% (and yes, that’s particularly specific) of the people at the meeting opposed using county money for a TIF incentive. But the way I see it now, I see a 3-2 vote in favor occurring in September.

Community schools

In Howard County, I often hear “I don’t have kids in the school system, so I don’t really know much about it.” As I noted in my announcement speech, more than 60% of our budget in any given year is going to the schools. I pay high taxes and I want to be assured that they are being used well.

Why do people move here? The schools rank high on the list of reasons. In college, I was an Honors student and many of my neighbors on Easton 5 were Howard County kids. I was like, there are that many schools in Howard County? I thought it was just Merriweather…

I moved here because I got a job in the Baltimore office of Arthur Andersen. I had four or five offers in the DC/Tysons Corner area from the Big Six accounting firms. But a couple friends convinced me Baltimore was the fun office. Being a Washingtonian and having family in Montgomery County, I figured Columbia made sense. I fell in love with Columbia and decided to stay.

I went to private school for 12 years. But when it came to the decision for my daughter, my husband and I were pretty sure we’d be foolish not to send her to such a great system. I sometimes questioned it when I hear people talk about Wilde Lake – negatively.

That’s why I was happy that the Wilde Lake Village Board reached out to my village board for partnering on an Education Committee. Town Center has no schools, so our kids go to the Wilde Lake schools. In meeting with the chair of the committee, I was happy to find that a retiree spends his time doing robotics and other extracurricular science activities for our community schools. And he wants to partner with the local schools to help them in a multitude of ways – volunteer opportunities for community service requirements, providing speakers and publicizing school events. He wants to cheerlead for the schools, because it’s common sense to him.

It’s common sense to me too and I’m glad that Wilde Lake has a positive outlook on their local schools.

Opinions are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of any other organization or person.