BYOD Update

Update to my daughter’s usage of BYOD at her middle school – I think we’re at two instances of classroom usage. Here’s my October post:

http://kirstycat1209.blogspot.com/2015/10/when-plan-doesnt-come-together.html

And then I read this article about a teacher’s experience of using electronic devices…in THIRD GRADE. The socialization skills of her students are being stunted by an overreliance and overuse of the iPads. The quietness of eight year olds all mesmerized by screens? Maybe needed for a 15 minute break when the children have behaved well and the teachers need to chat? But dominating their schoolday?

I had been thinking about the inconsistencies of what pediatricians tell us about limiting screen time and what these policies are encouraging. Although the AAP focuses on entertainment, they encourage the non-electronic formats of books and magazines.

But this article also elucidated the issues of what we expect our educators to be for our children. Are they supposed to be tech experts? If a book online is assigned, should the ability to track student progress be available? What Pandora’s box could that open up? When tablets and wi-fi don’t work, what’s the backup plan? Are educators expected to have constant analog backups on their lesson plans? (Given they’re already employing those backups here due to the partially working grading/learning management software HCPSS currently “uses” I guess that would be a yes…) (That article is ten weeks old, but trust me, students are still “disappearing” from classes.)

Do I sound like a Luddite? I am NOT. I LOVE technology and make many of my consumer purchasing decisions based on that. Our children should be exposed to computers sometimes, but not to the exclusion of student and teacher interaction. I remember a lesson I witnessed as a volunteer in kindergarten. The teacher used Google maps to show the kids the satellite view and to talk about roads and buildings and the surrounding community. She asked them questions about places and the kids and she interacted and shared common experiences. That was cool and meant something, but it didn’t stifle socialization.

At the recent town hall held by a bipartisan group of Howard County legislators, one speaker mentioned BYOD and felt the lack of a plan as well, plus the holding back of information regarding the policy. It’s not just me at my daughter’s middle school.

But at lunch today across three periods, I saw plenty of device use. During their downtime, kids are hopping onto their devices. Good thing they get social interaction during class.

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Choose Advocacy

Over the past few years, I have learned a lot about the different advocacy groups here. We have so many intelligent, informed and caring people in Howard County. In recent days, I have been proud and impressed with my neighbors.

Monday night, I attended an event for Grassroots. If you aren’t familiar with their mission, please look at their website. They help displaced people with medical care, counseling, financial help and food & shelter.

At the Howard County state delegation forum Tuesday night, the Community Action Council asked for an expansion of their food bank facilities. Demands on the county food bank have been increasing exponentially. The amount requested seems rather small and Delegate Frank Turner asked whether our food bank compares to Anne Arundel County.

The Police Department and others supported a bill to combat human trafficking. Some activists had visited questionable establishments to gather information and provide resources to potential victims. Entering such places is risky, but they are trying to help innocent people.

Delegate Miller & Delegate Atterbeary proposed two bills regarding the Howard County Public School System on transparency and election system, respectively. School employees that testified opposed both bills, which concerns me. Residents supported both bills overwhelmingly.

There were dozens of people who came to Ellicott City on a cold, rainy night to advocate for their issues. While I might not agree with everyone’s viewpoints on a particular issue, I was happy to see an informed community willing to speak on the record.