Statistics vs. People

On the campaign trail last week, I spoke to a woman whose children are now out of HCPSS, a fact she celebrates with joy. Her kids attended a great school in Ellicott City, but she and they did not have a great time.

Some of that related to Special Education Services. They had moved here specifically for their daughter’s needs, but spent a few years arguing with their public school. Finally, they gave up the fight and sent the child to a private school. At an exorbitant cost. They made the sacrifice for their daughter’s education, but not everyone has that option. Despite Howard County being one of the richest counties in the nation, we do have poverty. That poverty may come along with an ignorance over opportunities and the way to “fight” for  your child.

But there are some people who advocate to the nth degree to get their kids in Gifted & Talented programs. That’s why this woman’s story struck me. She was discussing another one of her children having an extended illness during elementary school. The child had been in G/T, but she had never thought her kid was that academically inclined. After returning to her elementary school, it became clear that the child was way behind and having trouble catching up. The mother had to demand for her kid to be returned to the on-grade level class. Fight tooth and nail.

We are so busy trying to top other counties and states with our statistics at the cost of our children. Does the number of kids in G/T at a school make that one so much better than the school two miles away? Taking away classes like World Religions to increase high school Advanced Placement enrollment? (Seems to me that with current events resembling the Medieval period and in a diverse county like Howard, that class would be a perfectly topical elective.) Getting a new A/P class only requires seven students, while a non-A/P class like African American studies requires 12 to register.

Instead, HCPSS is pushing us to be Lake Wobegon – “Well, that’s the news from Lake Wobegon, where all the women are strong, all the men are good looking, and all the children are above average.”

I stopped my Mathematics education at Calculus II but all children are not above average. All children do, however, deserve to be treated as individuals in achieving their own goals, not those designed to make HCPSS look good.

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2 thoughts on “Statistics vs. People

  1. Lisa says:

    Thank goodness I’m not the only one noticing this madness!! I DO NOT want my kids to be taking 3-4 AP classes per year. If they take 1 per year I think that’s sufficient. They have their whole lives to work and succumb to the pressures of life, why not let them enjoy their childhood/teens and all the variety that HS has to offer. I wish more parents would catch on that this is just a marketing gimmick between the school system and the Chamber of Commerce to pump tax money into HoCo.

    Like

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